Infrastructure

Learn How to Take a Leading Role in Infrastructure Discussions and Decisions

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Date: Tuesday, September 17, 2013
Time: 3:00 p.m., EST
Conceptual Models for Infrastructure Leadership

Register and access the webinar

In policy and aspirational documents both the American Society of Civil Engineers and the National Academy of Engineering have called for engineers of the 21st century to take a leading role in infrastructure discussions and decisions. These discussions and decisions routinely involve stakeholders, constituencies, and organizations that are unfamiliar with traditional engineering modeling and analysis techniques. Removing communication barriers and assuming a leadership role in these conversations requires engineers to adopt new conceptual models that enhance communication between people with dissimilar backgrounds and promote shared understanding.

In this webinar you will learn how to explain the six functions necessary for the proper functioning of an infrastructure; describe any infrastructure to a technical or non-technical audience using the Component Model; develop an infrastructure assessment plan using the Assessment Model; lead discussions among diverse stakeholders on the design of resilient infrastructures that incorporates risk management, engineering design, emergency response, and rationally sequenced recovery.
Presented by: Lt. Col. Steven Hart, Ph.D., P.E., M.ASCE and J. Ledlie Klosky, Ph.D., P.E., M.ASCE

Steve Hart is a Lieutenant Colonel in the United States Army Corps of Engineers with over 25 years of service in both command and staff positions in Iraq, Kuwait, Panama, Germany, Korea, and the United States.

Dr. Led Klosky is an associate professor of civil engineering in the Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering and Deputy Director of the Center for Innovation and Engineering at West Point.  

Italy to Build the World's Largest Suspension Bridge Between Calabria and Sicily

Thursday, February 26, 2009

Critics say that at six billion euros, the cost of the two-and-a-half mile bridge across the Strait of Messina, is far too high and have questioned the wisdom of building such a giant span in a region which is prone to earthquakes.

President Obama Releases an Outline of His Fiscal Year 2010 Budget Proposal.

Friday, February 27, 2009

In the President's introductory remarks for his presentation of the $3.55 trillion budget proposal, he cites ASCE's 2009 Report Card for America's Infrastructure as the reason the nation needs to invest in infrastructure for our continued health, welfare, and economic viability.



The President's complete budget proposal will be released at the end of April. Below is a summary of the infrastructure provisions included in the overview released this week.  Read the Full Budget

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): In a major change from previous budgets, the Obama administration proposed a budget of $10.5 billion for the EPA in fiscal year 2010. This is a 35 percent increase over the $7.8 billion appropriated for the agency in FY 2009.

The bulk of the increase would go for wastewater and drinking water infrastructure, with the Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act State revolving Loan Fund (SRF) programs together receiving $3.9 billion total. The two programs are slated to receive $1.5 billion in the FY 2009 appropriations bill cleared by the House this week. See the related story below.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers: President Obama's budget dedicates $5.1 billion in FY 2010 for civil works infrastructure programs. This is down from the $6.5 billion for FY 2009. The Corps also received $4.6 billion in emergency spending under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

U.S. Department of Transportation: The President's budget includes $72.5 billion for the entire department - a $2 billion increase from FY 2009. Of that total, the budget proposes another $1 billion for the next 5 years, in addition to the $8 billion in the stimulus package, for high speed rail.

New provisions in the budget proposal to remove the firewall around highway and transit funding drew heavy criticism from some on Capitol Hill. Intended to improve transparency, removing the firewall means transportation would be treated as discretionary spending under Obama's proposal. House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chairman James Oberstar (D-MN) opposes this plan since it would fund multi-year projects on a year by year basis.

National Science Foundation (NSF): The Administration proposes $7 billion for NSF, a 16% increase over FY 2008, as part of the President's Plan for Science and Innovation. According to the White House press release, the increase provides for support for graduate research fellowships and for early-career researchers; support for the education of technicians in the high-technology fields that drive the nation's economy; more novel high-risk, high-reward research proposals; and support for critical research priorities in global climate change.

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST): The president's FY 2010 budget requests an appropriation of $638 million for NIST. The request includes increases of $71 million for research initiatives at NIST Laboratories and National Research Facilities, and $62 million for Construction and Major Renovations as part of for President Bush's 10-year American Competitiveness Initiative.

ASCE supports the inclusion of $3.3 million for the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program, and $4 million for research to build disaster resistant communities.

Also included in the request is $4 million to transition the Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership consulting centers to a self supporting basis as intended in the program's original authorization, and does not include new funding for the Technology Innovation Program (successor to the Advanced Technology Program).

Department of Education: The exact funding request for the K-12 science-technology-engineering-math (STEM) program was not available at press time.

Department of Energy: While the Department of Energy had not released details of the FY 2010 budget, the White House press release noted that overall the Department requests for $26.3 billion, up from $24.1 billion in FY 2008. The White House release notes the request provides for increases in scientific research on new energy sources and energy efficiency.

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS): The Department of Interior has not released details of the FY 2010 request.

The National Academy Releases New Report

Friday, April 3, 2009

National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academies releases a report "Sustainable Critical Infrastructure Systems: A Framework for Meeting 21st Century Imperatives". The NRC appointed an ad hoc committee of experts to identify and frame fundamental challenges in moving toward critical infrastructure systems that are physically, economically, and environmentally sustainable. This report summarizes the committee's findings after gathering industry experts for an interactive workshop in May 2007.

The report suggests that a new paradigm is needed for the renewal of critical infrastructure systems such as water, wastewater, power, transportation, and telecommunications. It describes a framework for identifying new approaches, technologies, and financing mechanisms to develop sustainable systems for the 21st century. Elements of the framework include developing a broad national vision, a focus on providing essential services, and the use of collaborative, systems-based approaches.

Hackers Penetrate U.S. Electrical Grid

Wednesday, April 8, 2009

Cyberspies have penetrated the U.S. electrical grid and left behind software programs that could be used to disrupt the system, according to current and former national-security officials.

The National Surface Transportation and Revenue Study Commission Release Final Report

Wednesday, June 17, 2009

The National Surface Transportation and Revenue Study Commission has released its Report to Congress. Transportation for Tomorrow: Report of the National Surface Transportation Policy and Revenue Study Commission, prepared by a specially convened Commission, meets the charge given under Section 1909 of the Safe Accountable, Flexible and Efficient Transportation Equity Act – A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU). The Report includes detailed recommendations for creating and sustaining a pre-eminent surface transportation system in the United States. The Commission is grateful to all of the individuals and organizations who shared their views and experiences in writing and at hearings and public meetings across the nation.

The National Surface Transportation and Revenue Study Commission Release Final Report

Wednesday, June 17, 2009

The National Surface Transportation and Revenue Study Commission has released its Report to Congress. Transportation for Tomorrow: Report of the National Surface Transportation Policy and Revenue Study Commission, prepared by a specially convened Commission, meets the charge given under Section 1909 of the Safe Accountable, Flexible and Efficient Transportation Equity Act – A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU). The Report includes detailed recommendations for creating and sustaining a pre-eminent surface transportation system in the United States. The Commission is grateful to all of the individuals and organizations who shared their views and experiences in writing and at hearings and public meetings across the nation.

Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Learning Series

Monday, August 31, 2009

Sponsored by the US Department of Homeland Security, the Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources (CIKR) Learning Series continues in the fall of 2009 with a fresh lineup of one-hour Web-based seminars providing expert presentations on the tools, trends, issues, and best practices for infrastructure protection and resilience.

Series offerings are available free of charge and designed for CIKR owners and operators and officials with responsibility for risk, security, and emergency management functions.

Falling Debris on Bay Bridge Spotlights Need for Action

Thursday, October 29, 2009

Falling debris forced closure in the bridge which spans the San Francisco Bay and carries an average of 280,000 vehicles daily. The pieces that fell this week raise a troubling issue as repairs had just been made in September to the same section of the 73-year-old bridge. In the wake of the Minnesota Bridge collapse experts say "If we don't start making substantial progress in five years, we will have more collapses."

Infrastructure Inhibits Alternative Engery Development

Wednesday, February 25, 2009

Outdated electrical grid, as well as the recession, could hinder the development of the country's solar and wind sectors.

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